Farmhouse Style EXTRA

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Farmhouse Style EXTRA

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Dazzling Ceilings

Dazzling Ceilings
More than 50 wood pallets were used in the creation of the ceiling treatment in the Browns’ living and laundry rooms.
Photographed and Styled by Gridley + Graves.

When it comes to decorating a room, many homeowners put an emphasis on flooring and wall decor, but it pays to include the ceiling—often dubbed the “fifth wall”—in your design plans. Adding an interesting treatment, such as beams or cladding, contributes a crowning touch of color, pattern or texture to a room, which is something two of the homeowners featured in our Autumn 2021 issue clearly recognize.

The wow factor in the living and laundry rooms in Christy and Jacob Brown’s Villa Rica, Georgia, home comes from custom wood ceilings, which the Browns made by breaking down and sanding pallet wood.

“I didn’t want just one color of wood—oak or walnut, for instance,” says Christy, of the Brownies Forever Farmhouse blog. In order to get the color and grain variations she desired, the couple broke down about 50 wood pallets. The pieces were sanded with rough-grit sandpaper, then dusted well and left in their natural, no-finish state before installing.

Though the prep took several weeks, the installation—including custom-cutting the boards to create a random pattern—took just one day, and the results really enhance the character of the rooms.

Dazzling Ceilings
Floor-joist ceilings contribute a historical feel to Liz Marie and Jose Galvan’s kitchen.
Photographed and Styled by Gridley + Graves.

When they renovated the kitchen in their Michigan farmhouse, Liz Marie Galvan of the Liz Marie Blog and her husband, Jose, wanted to give it a more historical and custom feel, so they removed the existing ceiling and installed their own floor-joist version.

While time-consuming, the project requires only basic materials. Jose used 2-inch nails and 1 x 4 primed MDF to achieve the planked look between joists. He installed each individual plank into 1 x 8 pine that he’d cut down to 1 x 2 strips.

If you are interested in a similar treatment, the Galvans recommend that before you cut any 1 x 4 planks, take four measurements between your floor joists to pinpoint any spots where the width between joists might vary.

Read more about the Browns’ home in “From Blank Canvas to Farmhouse Cozy” and the Galvans’ home in “Autumn at White Cottage Farm,” both in the Autumn 2021 issue of Farmhouse Style.

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